A unique Greenhouse in Belgium

published in: Architecture By Guest, 04 March 2009

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Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

Guest Contribution by Vera Tay Shumei

The Greenhouse - once a symbol of wealth and exclusivity back when it used to house the cucumbers for Emperor Tiberius’s table. Now, the once noble structure takes on a more humble form through Project ‘Greenhouse’.
Emerging amidst a myriad of Eco-homes, the ‘greenhouse’ stands out because of its affordability and heat trapping ability. The structure is framed by a ready-made steel structure and encased in an alternating series of super-insulating transparent glass and translucent polycarbonate plates. Extra insulation is also added at the back of the glass walls to shield certain areas of the house from the public eye. Through the clever use of the insulating glass, the same heating effect that is found in a real greenhouse is successfully mimicked. This occurs when heat from the sun’s rays passes through the glass walls and warms up the interior whilst the insulation in the glass prevents the heat from escaping.

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved


The greenhouse is located in Asse - Belgium. Designed by the Belgian architect Carl Verdickt, the house is furnished minimally with whites and woods to complement the feeling of ‘openness’ that prevails throughout the abode. Such is achieved through the reverted house layout in which the private quarters are located below whilst the rest of the house is located above and set in an open-floor concept. This way, the architect is able to take advantage of the elevation to highlight the foliage and surrounding scenery through the floor-to-ceiling windows as well as attain ‘openness’.
A loft is added to serve as a private room for social or private activities like a reading room to maximise the use of space without hampering the airiness. For the nighttime, the revolving fireplace installed at the side of the room would provide solace on particularly wintry nights.

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved


In contrast to the second storey, the private quarters beneath is arranged in a ‘closed’ manner with narrow corridors and minimal windows. It is likely that this is done deliberately, perhaps to further heighten the sensation of openness above when you walk up the stairs and to emphasize the level of privacy below.

photos by Luc Roymans

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

Photo © Luc Roymans. All rights reserved

sources:

Carl Verdickt , Luc Roymans

  • friend
    fanatic | 2009-03-05 17:21:16

    i juz feel personally, that the fire-place whatever you call it. spoiled the entire interior, the large tube hanging from the ceiling. Is so unsightly! They could have install a much better looking object (fire-place)

  • friend
    KB | 2009-03-06 17:23:36

    Green house in Belgium? My tiny brain is about to explode with joy- two of my favorite house design terms melded into one post, one beautiful home...it's like I just ate chocolate.

  • friend
    nca | 2009-03-09 08:41:18

    Over all I really love this house. I'm seeing really great designs coming out of both the Netherlands and Japan these days. Really refined, and aiding to those simple pleasures in life. Light and space, and room to grow. Very gorgeous. N

  • friend
    Jettgirl24 | 2009-03-21 21:32:11

    I disagree, I think the fireplace loos beautiful. I love the juxtaposition of industrial elements such as the fireplace and the concrete floors and countertops with the rustic wood elements of the dining table and the sleek modern elements in dining chairs and the cabinetry. Absolutely wonderful.

  • friend
    Tom Tack | 2010-06-09 00:17:15

    To see more great architecture in Belgium: http://www.ilovebelgium.be/blog/top-10-architecture/

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