Dressing With Light

published in: Travel By Ricardo Hernandez, 11 June 2010

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Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

We all agree that preserving culture and history is crucial to future generations understanding and learning from it. Located 69 km from Barcelona, Vic is the capital of the comarca of Osona and an important city in Spanish history. The restoration project of Trinitaris Church by Roldan+Berengue Architects is a testament of how we can be part of history while utilizing it in contemporary ways. This baroque church dating back to 1741 went through its fair share of tumultuous facets during the spanish civil war leaving its use fractured and not fully engaged to its once majestic presence. Due to its proximity to Barcelona and the cultural engagement of this Spanish area, Trinitaris was updated and used for conferences, concerts and social gatherings, even though the domes were black from past fires and the church still showed the roots of its tumultuous past. Time for its Renaissance once again.

Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

The rehabilitation of Trinitarian Church was implemented through careful consideration of its use and history. Working exclusively with metal and light, R+B was able to inject a new layer into the historic building without taking over its rich and important history. On the contrary, R+B utilized the new layers to accentuate the rich architectural details that once made this church spectacular. Utilizing metaphor and creativity, they bring inside a sequence of white gargoyles along the long cornice to add rhythm to the nave while implementing light, ventilation and sound into the units. This keeps the experience focused on the church's proportions and details. The lighting execution allows the Trinitaris Church to have multiple experiences as light intensifies or diminishes.

Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

As the vaults are accentuated, only the floor and its reflectivity add more to this experience. By utilizing iron sheets as pavement along the entire floor, it expands and extends this interior space and makes you feel as if you were swimming in water. The floor is seamless as it extends vertically to conceal the heating system and shapes into seating in the side walls. The careful integration of materials to coexist with the original architectural work is quite impressive and beautiful. The execution is commendable and respectful to this historic building. One can only imagine being part of history as Trinitaris Church is once again open for all to enjoy.

Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

Image Courtesy of Roldan+Berengue Architects

sources:

Roldan+Berengue Architects

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TAGS: Religious
  • friend
    Anonymous | 2010-06-12 05:38:33

    its Grand

  • friend
    flow | 2010-06-13 15:10:19

    great work!!

  • friend
    Maricel | 2010-06-14 05:09:29

    I thought there's a water in the middle of it because of the reflection of the polished floor. The design of the structure is just perfect for the place.

  • friend
    Davidikus | 2010-06-14 18:04:57

    These pictures are splendid. Light is an integral part of architecture; and sometimes of a painting. Whoever has seen the Caravaggio in situ in Rome (Saint Louis of the French church) will know what I mean: a lot of the interest of the paintings may be lost in very well lit environment (we see the clair-obscur differently). Here the light really reveals the volume, clearly not in a way that was intended originally but this is a very good example of adaptive reuse. http://davidikus.blogspot.com/

  • friend
    Jen | 2010-06-17 22:06:19

    WOW WOW WOW!!!!!

  • friend
    tangzuomei | 2010-08-14 06:03:26

    i"m a new designer .i like your picyure and your design .

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