Papabubble by Yuseke Seki & Jaime Hayon in Yokohama, Japan

published in: Interiors By Ricardo Hernandez, 26 June 2012

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photo © Takumi Ota

Most of us have a special connection with candy whereby we reminisce of our childhood memories and emotions of joy and entertainment. Conceived in Barcelona in 2004, Papabubble which creates candy creations each with their own set of experiences, textures and tastes, has since spread across the globe reviving the beauty of authentic hand-made candy in its wake.

We at Yatzer are pleased to share the opening of Papabubble Yokohama, Japan with you. Designed by Japanese designer Yusuke Seki in collaboration with Spanish designer and friend Jaime Hayon, the Yokohama branch is the third of its kind in Japan and this new location brings forward some new language to the interior fit out. Previous Papabubble locations were designed based on a laboratory style in order to show the careful amalgamation of ingredients that create these delicious sweet treats. The Yokohama store however is different as it is led by the unique design values of Yusuke and Jaime into a cohesive experience that shows not only their craftsmanship but pulls the brand into a new dimension.

The candy shop is located in an office area in Yokohama, a bay near to Tokyo in a building that is nearly half a decade old. Therefore renovations had to be made to the space and building. As the store space was on the street level, Yusuke Seki needed to create a connection between the urban artery and the interior experience. The white subway tile not only wraps the exteriors but actually folds within the space, giving it a consistent surface that although textured, disappears in its entirety, bringing forward the custom and unique millwork as well as the tables that Jaime Hayon designed especially for the product displays.

photo © Takumi Ota

The space feels open because the tiles are kept just below the ceiling height, exposing the soft color concrete in the ceiling to soften up the space and amplify it. As the use of white subway tiles and concrete produced a rather chilling effect in the space, Hayon brought in a deceptively massive but subtle wood counter countering the cold element and providing some weight to the interiors. The scale of the counter helps anchor the working area leading consumers along ordering, viewing and paying transactions. A further colored wall serves to pull you into the deepest area within this interior volume and connects you to the colorful candy that comes out of the previous counter.

Beyond the interior architectural scale, details take on the personality of the artisan candy. In the facade, a custom door with fenestration reminds you that you are entering a fun and inventive space. Unlike the previous laboratory style glasses that were previously used, the new custom bottles by Massimo Lunardo transport you to the whimsical and playful shapes of the candy itself. As a display of the artisan process, Jaime Hayon creates stunning pieces of furniture that lead consumers into the process of the artisan candy and into the display of these varieties of treats through the multi-level tables he has created.

If this is the direction Papabubble is taking towards their next locations from here on forward, we are excited to see how location will play a role in the collaborations to come. Small projects like this are an exciting marriage of product, place, space and designer. We thank Papabubble for both their sweet treats of candy and space.

photo © Takumi Ota

photo © Takumi Ota

photo © Takumi Ota

photo © Takumi Ota

photo © Takumi Ota

photo © Takumi Ota

photo © Takumi Ota

sources:

Papabubble

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