Multi Touch Light Table by Gerg

published in: Design By Ricardo Hernandez, 09 November 2010

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Image Courtesy of Gerg

Tools have evolved since the beginning of time. What started as a primary element to assist the human body has evolved as the human mind keeps finding ways to make them more efficient, aesthetically pleasing and generally cheaper for us to consume. With every improvement comes change but for the most part, we have seen change in tools as a gradual process due to the fact that adopting change is not easy for consumers. This does not mean that we cannot think ahead and visualize how tools would look and interact in the future, it just means that both trajectories (visionary and evolutionary) need to inform each other as both strive to improve tools and our quality of life through the use of those tools.

Image Courtesy of Gerg

Gregory Kaufman or Gerg as he prefers it, is a young designer from Houston with an interesting vision. A recent bfa graduate of the Kansas City Art Institute, Gerg chose to redesign a tool for music as his final Senior project, the DJ table. As a DJ himself, he saw an opportunity to make a change that would drastically influence DJing by not only thinking about the tool but also the logistics of owning and transporting the equipment. He found the process of DJing cumbersome and inefficient as DJs must go through an arduous process of preparing and transporting the equipment. Heavy, bulky, expensive and tedious are the tasks of set up and tear down. There is also the risk of dropping and damaging the equipment as you move back and forth between venues. Gerg saw an opportunity to consolidate these obstacles by developing and designing a digital DJ turntable.

Image Courtesy of Gerg

Image Courtesy of Gerg

He studied not only the logistics of purchasing and transporting, but also the facets of tactile behaviors that come with DJing. Gerg worked arduously considering the physical and emotional connection the DJ must have with equipment and audience. He developed a digital interface on a flat screen that will allow DJs to have more control and a more fluid process with their passion. Understanding the difficulty of not having the dimensional and tactile qualities of the turntables, Gerg designed a series of gestural interactions to compensate for not having dimensional parts. This clever solution allows the DJ to maintain his/her current integration with the music and the audience.


Video Courtesy of Gerg

Enough said, take a look at Gerg explaining the concept and demonstrating the product through a conceptual video. Go ahead and give us your opinion in UX, interaction and gestural considerations.

Image Courtesy of Gerg

Image Courtesy of Gerg

Image Courtesy of Gerg

Image Courtesy of Gerg

sources:

Gerg Werk

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TAGS: Music
  • friend
    georgios mathioudakis ( MAG Landscape Architects+Urban Designers) | 2010-11-09 20:21:49

    nice design...nice colours and graphics....excellent idea...but 2 fingers 3 fingers 4 fingers at time...imagine that in a club....a bit of a mess...i don't think is really working...

  • friend
    Adolpho Gutiard | 2010-11-16 03:13:22

    Love the concept , colors , looks easy to use or get used to . I would totally sport one of these in my club . Actually am an industrial design masters student and am actually working on a new dj controller / mixer concept . Your table is the emerging technology iv been looking for . Now to just make it portable . Im workin on a design .

  • friend
    Andrew Nilsen | 2010-12-10 19:58:27

    This is an interesting take on a DJ controller. Well done sir! As a DJ myself, I like the idea of a multi-touch interface that you don't have to worry about skipping, gear maintenance etc but this has some limitations (maybe?). I assume you can't change 2 different EQs on the same deck at the same time. Or change an EQ while changing the volume. This is why I think that physical knobs and decks still function better for a DJs needs. Also, I have to point out that the argument that DJs must drag all their gear to a club is not true anymore. I just think that you shouldn't start telling people about this amazing project with an argument that is not really relative unless you are playing at a coffee shop or bar that doesn't have a permanent DJ booth.

  • friend
    Luke Emery | 2010-12-29 00:09:52

    Its a nice idea, but...its been over five years since I began DJing and not once have I had to bring my own equipment to a venue. Sure, i've had to bring my vinyl but thats all. Plus my vinyl is my vinyl, tracks that i've sought out, dug out and discovered through hours of research, swapping and bartering. Not the sort of stuff you can just download off Itunes or Juno in a heartbeat. I don't get on with set-ups like this because they are fallible. One of the main points made here, against the use of traditional decks, is that you can drop them and they can break. Sure, thats definitely the case but you can also fix them fairly easily with a little know how, sometimes even on the fly. What happens if this equipment has something dropped on it, or a sensor breaks from overuse. It doesnt look like you could open it up with a screwdriver and fix it easily. Oh and on a technical note, what happens if an overenthusiastic clubber, DJ or friend tips a drink over the interface? Your mix is gonna sound pretty odd when youre drying your whole set-up with a tea towel. Finally, your whole set stored on a single USB drive? A massive box of records is a lot easier to hold on to than something that could fall through a hole in your pocket or get accidentally sat on.

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