Metropol Parasol // The World’s Largest Wooden Structure

published in: Architecture By Marcia Argyriades, 28 April 2011

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photo © Fernando Alda

photo © Fernando Alda

Project: Metropol Parasol
Redevelopment of Plaza de la Encarnacion, Seville, Spain
Function: archeological site, farmers market, elevated plaza, multiple bars and restaurants
Site area: 18,000 square meters
Building area: 5,000 square meters
Total floor Area: 12,670 square meters
Number of floors: 4
Height of the building: 28.50 meters
Structure: concrete, timber and steel
Principal Exterior: timber and granite
Principal interior material: concrete, granite and steel
Designing period: 2004-2005
Construction period: 2005-2011
Building/Cost: 90 Million Euro

photo © David Franck

What is there not to like about Metropol Parasol?  The waffle-like crown structure in Seville, Spain has been finally completed in April 2011 after a competition held by the city of Seville in 2004.  Located at Plaza de la Encarnacion, the stunning sequence of undulating parasols comprises the world's largest wooden structure. The Metropol Parasol project was part of the redevelopment of the Plaza de la Encarnacíon, designed by J. MAYER H. Architects, this project becomes the new icon for Seville, a place of identification and to articulate Seville's role as one of the world´s most fascinating cultural destinations.

photo © Fernando Alda

photo © Fernando Alda

Metropol’s interweaving waffle-like wooden panels rise from concrete base reinforced with steel, which are positioned in such a way to architecturally form canopies and walkways below the parasols. Metropol Parasol was given this contemporary organic design to explore the potential that the Plaza de la Encarnacion becomes the new fashionable, modern-day urban center. The Metropol Parasol’s function as a unique organic urban space within the crowded and dense fabric of the medieval city center of Seville allows for a variety of activities to be performed.  The exceedingly developed infrastructure aids in triggering the movement at the square, thus transforming it into a hive of activity – a social and cultural hub where both residents, visitors and tourists can gather under the architecturally motivating ‘crown-like waffle’.

photo © Fernando Alda

Realized as one of the largest and most innovative bonded timber-constructions with a polyurethane coating, the parasols grow out of the archaeological excavation site into a contemporary landmark, defining a unique relationship between the historical and the contemporary city.” J. MAYER H. Architects

photo © Fernando Alda

The Metropol Parasol scheme with its imposing timber structure offers a range of attractions and amenities to be used by the public.  Such functions include an archaeological museum, a farmers market, an elevated plaza, and multiple bars and restaurants underneath and inside the parasols, as well as a panorama terrace on the upper level of the parasols. Realized as one of the largest and most innovative bonded timber-constructions with a polyurethane coating, the parasols grow out of the archaeological excavation site into a contemporary landmark, thus defining a distinctive relationship between the historical medieval city and the contemporary city beat!  Metropol Parasols mix-used multicultural program sets off a dynamic development for culture and commerce in the heart of Seville and beyond.

photo © David Franck

the form of this building was inspired by the vaults of Seville's expansive cathedral – I wanted to create a "cathedral without walls" that would be "democratic" – and also by the handsome trees already in the square.’' Jürgen Mayer H

photo © David Franck

The design scheme and the idea of Metropol Parasol was to offer shade, a valuable ‘service’ in a city as sunny and hot as Seville, and so make the square, which used to operate as a parking lot more livable. Respecting the presence of the Roman ruins, the architectural planning was dealt in such a way as to leave the ruins undisturbed.  Columns supporting the crown could only be positioned in a few places, involving ambitious structure – designed with the help of the engineers Arup – to span the gaps between them.  From these conditions came the mushroom stem-like torsos, a sufficient amount to include lifts and stairs, and a structural system using timber and steel, held together with high-performance polyurethane resin, tested to ensure it would endure even the highest temperatures in this spot. Among the project's pride is that it is the world's largest construction to be held together by polyurethane (foam seal).

photo © Fernando Alda

photo © Fernando Alda

Jürgen Mayer H. whose work we’ve previously presented on Yatzer is an architect who started off as an artist.  The way he deals with the human factor within a given space in each of his projects is very interesting; furthermore, he contains elements of art and sculpture in his architecture, something that many architects have forgotten about.  Jürgen Mayer H. notices art and architecture as similar, being both about the interrelation of human and space.  His buildings have the complex sculptural-like shapes, with non-repeating elements, that computerized design and construction make possible, hence, no two parts of the Parasol are identical.

photo © David Franck

photo © David Franck

The parasols provide for shade, the game of light and shadows is quite out of the ordinary and attention grabbing through this architectural design. When viewed from different angles, Metropol Parasol has a fantastic, daring, creative and inventive sculpture-like repetitive geometric plan.   Residents of Seville have distinct feelings towards Metropol Parasol; but as a person who prefers to look on the bright side and screen out the negative comments when they have no basis or reasoning, I prefer the positive comments which claim that: ‘it is absolutely amazing!  Very surprising!,’ ‘it is incredible to see people's faces amazed watching this galactic waffle-like structure landing in such a traditional city,’ ‘I have to admit that I always loved this project since its announcement in 2004, and I have to admit that many people in Seville don't like it. But you know what?  Most Parisians hated Eiffel tower in the beginning...!’ After all, Eiffel tower is the landmark of Paris; did Jürgen Mayer H. make it by establishing his own landmark for the medieval city of Seville, Spain?  I think yes!  What do you think?

photo © Fernando Alda

photo © Fernando Alda

photo © David Franck

photo © David Franck

photo © J. MAYER H. Architects

Credits and Data
Metropol Parasol
Redevelopment of Plaza de la Encarnacion, Seville, Spain
Client: Ayuntamiento de Sevilla und SACYR
Architects: J. MAYER H. Architects
Project Architect:  Jürgen Mayer H.,  Andre Santer,  Marta Ramírez Iglesias
Project Team: Ana Alonso de la Varga, Jan-Christoph Stockebrand, Marcus Blum, Paul Angelier, Hans Schneider, Thorsten Blatter, Wilko Hoffmann, Claudia Marcinowski, Sebastian Finckh, Alessandra Raponi, Olivier Jacques, Nai Huei Wang, Dirk Blomeyer (Management Consultant 1st Phase)

© J. MAYER H. Architects

© J. MAYER H. Architects

Competition Team:  Jürgen Mayer H, Dominik Schwarzer, Wilko Hoffmann, Ingmar Schmidt, Jan-Christoph Stockebrand, Julia Neitzel, Klaus Küppers, Georg Schmidthals, Andre Santer, Daria Trovato
Technical Support for Plants – Competition 2nd Phase only: Coqui-Malachowska-Coqui with Thomas Waldau
Technical Consultant and Multidisciplinary Engineers for Realization: Arup
Project Manager: Jose de la Peña, Jan-Peter Koppitz
Project Team Statics: Romain Buffat, Kayin Dawoodi, Steffen Janitz, Andres Garzón, Enrique González, Carlos Merino, Estrella Morato, Victor Rodríguez Izquierdo, Volker Schmid
Project Team Building Services: Salvador Castilla, Alborada Delgado, Marta Figueruelo Calvo
Project Team Fire Protection: George Faller, Benjamin Barry-Otsoa, Jimmy Jonsson
Timber engineering and detail design: Finnforest
Photographers: David Franck, Fernando Alda
Plexi-Model: Werk 5, Photographer: Uwe Walter
Timber-Model: Finnforest
International Competition: 1. Prize, 2004
Project: 2004-2011
Opening: March 2011
Completion: April 2011
- Permanent Collection of Museum of Modern Art, NY and Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin
- Permanent Collection of DAM, Deutsches Architekturmuseum Frankfurt, Germany
- Holcim Award, 2005, Winner Europe Bronze for Sustainable Construction

photo © Ignacio Ysasi

photo © J. MAYER H. Architects

video © ARUP Group

sources:

J. MAYER H. Architects

  • friend
    Maria Sfyraki | 2011-04-28 14:22:00

    My favorite capture is the first one. Looks like the urban texture of the city is a lake, with calm waters. And the proposed project is just a colorful water lily.

  • friend
    Haris Evagelou | 2011-04-28 15:13:47

    How amazing! Stunning pictures and a great illustration of how to make a beautiful city even more attractive! Well Done

  • friend
    Nik | 2011-04-28 23:13:00

    Wonderful creation of a free spirit!

  • friend
    Collier Hageman | 2011-04-28 23:14:28

    This is an amazing and intriguing construction, but it is NOT the largest wooden structure in the world. Hangers #1 and #2 at Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, in Tustin, California hold that honor. The Metropol would fit entirely inside either of these hangars, with room to spare. To give you some idea of the size of these hangars - they were built to house blimps and were larger than necessary. The Goodyear blimp easily fits inside them, and its not even a tight fit.

  • friend
    Marcus114 | 2011-04-29 11:57:14

    With deep respect - it isn't the largest wooden structure - its also made of wood and concrete. One that may compare and may be the largest purely wooden structure is the Trestle test system built in Albuquerque New Mexico as part of an EMP test system. I have been there and it is so impressive - see here http://www.ece.unm.edu/summa/notes/trestle.html - sadly they have disconnected the fire prevention system so its viulnerable, but I can tel you now it is as awesome in its size and capabilities as this place is in its beuaty. And yes they tested B52 bombers on it!!

  • friend
    andrew stover | 2011-04-30 13:17:46

    So much wood. Why must we destroy our forests for beauty, especially for a great modern building in a cultural focus. This seems quite perverse. It is a fantastic structure otherwise.

  • friend
    Kosmas Apatangelos | 2011-04-30 21:19:00

    Jaw-dropping

  • friend
    Andrew | 2011-05-01 07:30:52

    Glad to see people are wasting valuable land and less valuable trees for such a useless and barely aesthetically pleasing structure

  • friend
    Harry | 2011-05-01 20:07:01

    Breathtaking

  • friend
    RONA KRUGER | 2011-05-02 22:20:42

    THIS IS SO EXCITING................IT IS A BALANCE OF FUNCTIONAL DESIGN AND AWESOME USE OF ORIGINAL MATERIALS. IT WOULD LOOK GOOD HERE, WHERE SUN IS FOREVER THERE...

  • friend
    Eltercerhombre | 2011-05-02 23:02:34

    First, the budget for this work is on the hundred million euros Second, the work is done in the historic heart of Seville Third, the materials are not initially designed for a city that quietly than forty-two degrees Celsius in August. Fourth: We are educating the ecology and then half forest deforestation for this absurdity. Five: Sevilla politicians do not deserve to middling A visionary architect Aníbal González was designed in 1927 a call from The Palm Avenue to four lanes when there were only carriages and some cars.

  • friend
    Pérez López | 2011-05-02 23:35:23

    Las "Setas de la Encarnación".

  • friend
    background | 2011-05-03 00:31:26

    Beautiful, but... Is it really functional? Is it a good parasol? What about the rain (not very common in Sevilla, but it also happens)?

  • friend
    Benjamin | 2011-05-03 06:31:42

    This is not a real wood structure, because it contains many hard ware, concrete, granite and steel The wood frames are only the skin of the hard ware, concrete, granite and steel. Rubbish!

  • friend
    Benjamin | 2011-05-03 06:34:22

    Rubbish! Not a real wood structure! Just the skin of hardware,, concrete, granite and steel!

  • friend
    Klim | 2011-05-03 07:30:13

    This is the kind of art I hate. They wasted so many trees to build something completely pointless... They should have used all that wood and money to build homes for people in Africa, that would have been a lot more beneficial.

  • friend
    jony | 2011-05-03 10:22:51

    I do not want to vanish your enthusiasm but if you really think a bit about the building and how it has been constructed, your ideas would be more related to a big piece of shit than to its beautiness. The unemployment in Seville is around 23%. The community is still on debts from the Expo they realized in 92, which was also full of beautiful buildings such as this. Hence, the government just thinks about building huge and worthless buildings rather than enhancing the lifestyle of the population, promoting parks, sustainable employment, facilitating taking care systems for the increasing elder population, mitigating the social bad consequences of the crisis, promoting education, etc etc. However, once more, they've let us know how important we are for them and for their megalomaniac projects. So...please, do not bestow uniquely to the building the "artistical value" (although I like its psychedelic shape) and think more if we need it for the social well being right in a period of economic crisis. It's a kind of mockery.

  • friend
    Six | 2011-05-03 12:23:31

    Useless, expensive, an aesthetical nonsense(this is the historical center!), and a problem for the people living close (I´ve been living at Alcazares st. for one year while the works.. and that was like living in Mostar)... But.... how many politicians are eating Huelva prawns at the Feria in this moment??...and.. who pays??

  • friend
    Sanjeev Sabharwal | 2011-05-03 15:32:43

    It's like a wandering umbrella, caught in time exposure mode. Anybody not liking it must be out of their feeble minds!

  • friend
    Penelope | 2011-05-03 22:39:11

    So cool! I love how they've destroyed an entire forest to make this giant piece of pseudo-art... Less oxygen for the world! Plus is not functional, just ugly.

  • friend
    pgomez | 2011-05-04 11:24:08

    The best of all is that in the hottest part of the year it doesn't give sun protection, only in winter and at sunrise or noon, check the photos adobe. Anyway it´s a huge pavilion and a perfect balcony at the third floor of the adjacent buildings. And the wood isn't structural, it´s just a cover over the real stell-concrete structure.

  • friend
    Manuel García | 2011-05-04 12:02:32

    AWESOME WHAT I DO READ!!! you people do not need to like the project it is your right as it is a respectable question of taste. What I can not believe is that almost everybody writing comments her consider itself a Ecologist but do not Understand anything about ecological use of Building Materials. The use of wood instead of bricks, metals, plastic or concrete is not only not bad, but a very good thing. The more wood is cut the more CO2 it is sequestrated and allow more CO2 to be captured by the new growing trees. THE MAIN THING IS TO USE CERTIFIED WOOD WHICH GIVES YOU THE CERTAINTY THAT NEW ONES ARE GROWING. The world needs to limit the use of the common materials which need lots of energy and thus CO2 generation to be produce and use more timber which takes the CO2 out of the atmosphere and fixes it in the building for centuries and after it can be recycled in many ways. Please People if you feel you are Ecologists, read some books!!!

  • friend
    Blog Técnico de la Madera | 2011-05-04 14:23:30

    Why you people keep telling a forest is been destroyed to do this? It is completely the opposite, with the revenue of the use of this timber forests can be maintained and growed up.

  • friend
    Zack | 2011-05-04 22:54:31

    This is not a waste of wood. Yeah it is a structure made with a definite abundance of wood, but it is no waste. The beauty of nature and forests, is that you can simple plant another tree. Multiple trees. Whole plots of trees. This is something the Forest Service does. They harvest seeds from every type of tree so they can continue to grow them in their habitats.

  • friend
    Penelope Belda | 2011-05-05 13:16:34

    I do not see any benefit of this structure. First, it does not fit at all in the estetical ambient of the city. Second, the colour is strange and much to clear. Third, it seems that it does no give shadow because it is much too high. Fourth, I am sure that the people of Sevilla would have preferred to spend the money in really important things. It is really a shame how money has been wasted for this ugly and not useful construction.

  • friend
    Katia | 2011-05-06 00:23:18

    I simply love it! It's a fantastic way of combining art with architecture, commerce and culture. Just look at the ugly shopping centers you find world wide..., this one has bars, a museum and a market all together in an aesthetic beautiful building. The world is bad enough with hungry and poor people and a destroyed environment. Let's celebrate that we have culture and new technologies and we can create a better world! Be happy!

  • friend
    luison | 2011-05-06 13:31:31

    I live in Seville and i can say that it´s marvelous but at first of all i thought it couldn't be perfect.

  • friend
    Samuele | 2011-05-06 18:48:35

    fantastic shots by Fernando Alda, one of the best architecture photographer in Spain! The project is an ugly marketing operation, where the architecture is a plastic show completely sold to money and politicians. The cost is almost 100 milions euro, just for a big sculpture. The public space doesn't work, it's just the roof of the market... Architecture is first of all ideas: what's the idea inside this project?? It's just a stupid show for stupid people...

  • friend
    Montse | 2011-05-09 22:11:35

    I completely agree wih "Eltercerhombre". Those who like it are kindly invited to come to Seville and spend a couple of hours under this modern wooden structure in July, August... We'll talk about it then. Apart from this, there are a lot of interesting old buildings completely abandoned in this city. A pity! They deserve a better public appointment.

  • friend
    Beans | 2011-05-10 02:59:50

    It's a tumor on the city. It clearly does not belong. It gives nothing-- it only demands. It demands attention, it demands space. It refuses to acknowledge anything around it. It serves no purpose other than its own glorification. And yet it is still too low and squat to even serve as a monument. This is the kind of terrible architecture that looks good as a model, a tiny sculpture on a pedestal, but looks like a bad joke once it's hovering menacingly over your city. What a shame--Spain got stuck with that abominable museum by Frank Gehry, and now this.

  • friend
    Eric | 2011-05-11 10:51:07

    I have read all the comments and there are some good arguments. Here are my views on the project as an outsider. I am sure there were quite a few jobs created because of this project over the past 6 years, which is good but can it be sustained? As long as the city ensures promotion of the business in the parasol and do not charge ridiculous rent I believe it will work as well as increase value of the residentia around it. In the aerial views it breaks the otherwise dull look of all the packed together buildings (with all due respect), so well done! On that note, why does the city not promote gardens on top of buildings? As far as the wood used, I am sure that the forest service has that covered. All in all, well done on a bold initiative. It is up to the people of Seville to accept it and make it work!

  • friend
    Yendor | 2011-05-11 16:46:43

    When the time comes, how do you re-paint it?

  • friend
    cati rodríguez | 2011-05-11 20:07:16

    Me parece un mamotreto de muy mal gusto, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta ue está en el casco antiguo. no pega ni con cola. Pero al margen de que esté bonito o feo (para gusto, los colores) ¿Quién se ha beneficiado de todo ésto? ¿Quién se ha llenado los bolsillos? Supongo que los de siempre. 23.000.000.000 millones de las antiguas pesetas. Mientras muchos están, o estamos pasando necesidades.¡¡¡Es terrorífico!!!

  • friend
    Penny Jackson | 2011-05-12 18:13:44

    Organic and beautiful!

  • friend
    Brian Hart | 2011-05-13 05:19:09

    I'm glad someone dealt with the issue of sequestered carbon before that part of the discussion got really off the rails. As an architect who has been involved in the protection and rehabilitation of historical city fabric for decades, I was not offended by the insertion. It does not crowd the buildings around it and in some ways mirrors the complexity of the historic details while staying far away from mimicry. The most telling photo is the one which frames the view of the parasol from a narrow street with intricate balcony and bay window details on the adjacent historical building. I could not have imagined this but I think it works on a number of levels.

  • friend
    Pepe | 2011-05-13 18:22:14

    it is beautiful since you stay looking ahead: the groundfloor treatment is so tacky with its little crater-like planters and that pots that seems to get left after a country-fair, why we iberic people don't know how to with plants?

  • friend
    Mac McMillan | 2011-05-13 19:40:30

    What the...? If you wanted shade, plant a tree, don't cut'em down. Art the doesn't mimic life, useless.

  • friend
    John Woolington | 2011-05-15 19:30:18

    World's largest wood structure? It is the worlds largest example of an ultra modern steel / concrete structure with a wood skin that has been dropped like a big turd into one of the most beautiful historic cities in Europe. Located in a place where it doesn't clash with a complex culture that is thousands of years old, it would be considered a work of art. In Sevilla it is reduced to a shocking eyesore. The architect and the city planners gave absolutely no thought to the most fundamental tenet of architecture that every first-year architecture student learns: "Does it complement the site?"

  • friend
    Andy from Beaverton | 2011-05-17 19:05:56

    Apparently those who called this the largest wooden structure in the world have never been to the Tillamook Air Museum. It is 1,072 feet (327 m) long and 296 feet (90 m) wide and 192 feet (59 m) tall. You could put 2 Metropol Parasols inside of it.

  • friend
    Egroj | 2011-05-18 10:55:22

    Wood for external building in Seville don´t have more than five years of life. ¡Congratulations!

  • friend
    Rosanna Curcillo | 2011-05-24 14:37:20

    It is perfectly... a genial idea for Seville!!!

  • friend
    Paul Dalmacio | 2011-05-28 09:36:21

    I think its awesome! i am such a fan of art installations and this is arguably the mother of them all! who cares about how they maintain a large wooden structure... let the engineers worry about that. I wanna enjoy visiting this someday!

  • friend
    jojo | 2011-06-02 10:34:47

    the largest wooden structure is the sky dome in Flagstaff Arizona USA

  • friend
    W.E.T. Inc. | 2011-06-06 23:03:27

    POETRY and architecture flow, like coletrain. interesting. like

  • friend
    Lauren | 2011-07-08 21:33:39

    What a waste of trees. What a wooden battle-field...

  • friend
    antonio | 2011-08-12 15:41:09

    did you know it´s street name is "las setas" (the mushrooms)? here you can see some of the pictures i took of them http://www.flickr.com/photos/antoniocid/sets/72157626276500411/show/

  • friend
    Jay Brauneisen | 2011-08-14 05:51:56

    I am also in the architectural profession, for about three years now and currently doing my masters thesis so I feel I have to comment. WOOD! To broaden your minds and inform your opinions please looks at this TEDx lecture on the properties of wood. There is a strong argument that it is a sustainable material (even with bad forestry practices) especially when compared to every other choice we have in the building industry. Concrete specifically is responsible for something like 5 or 8% of total carbon emissions globally, steel embodies a lot of energy too and is often shipped long distances to the construction site, especially in countries like Canada. So you also have to take transportation costs and carbon foot print into effect. Go look for TEDx Independent lectures Vancouver Watch this video! http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/947 (You’re looking for Michael Green, blonde guy 4th from the left) DESIGN: I think this is a very innovative and impressive project, I love the simple projection of different shaped planes in space, and despite its historical site, it is not offensive. I think a valid major criticism of this project is why curves? The grid of the wood panels could have been square in plan to relate more to the grid of the city, for example and still be interesting in section with the curves, which is how you experience it from the street. If wood is a good material for Seville, I don't know, wood does require maintenance but I can only hope the plastic coating is UV resistant. I think the structure as a shade device is a by-product used to sell the idea because I have to agree it is over-structured as a canopy and not that effective. The "structure" of the wood could have been more minimal and clothe or canvas introduced as a more effective shading device if that was desired. This is more easily replaced when damaged from the sun then re-applying a UV protective coating to the wood. WASTE? Many people felt this project to be a waste if materials and energy, suburbs are more wasteful. Our reliance especially in North America on cars, our obsession with big/fast vehicles and SUV's that embody a lot of energy to manufacture and only require a constant energy input to maintain ARE A REAL WASTE! Cars are not inherently bad, suburbs are not either, it is the way we use them that is and it would only require some restructuring and containment of sprawl to be more eco friendly. Except this is NOT the general discussion we are having. The forms of our cities are far more wasteful then this project. When thinking about this issues also please ask yourself who benefits from the current way we build our cities. If you dismiss this building out of hand as “wasteful” because you don’t like its form, you are making a poor argument and such an argument could be applied to all and any architecture. (Bilbao, look up “The Bilbao effect”) It would leave no room for experimentation and expression.

  • friend
    Reza Fard | 2011-08-25 20:15:56

    Actually, we need to promote community taste of function, beauty and architecture . this project could be a very unique experience for people passing under it to recognize tree, shade, parasol, framed sky and find themselves one more time in their city!

  • friend
    Ciara - Design Highs | 2011-09-12 18:48:53

    I love this amazing piece of design and engineering - the waffle effect is interesting. It makes me want to visit Seville which i do hope to do ...... it is an amazing public space and i particularly love the photo by Fernando Alda from the street. The interior shots are also very inspiring. To me it is beautiful.

  • friend
    Jane | 2011-09-20 22:20:51

    It looks sterile in these photos. I would like to see it filled with people and markets.

  • friend
    Justin Winchester | 2011-12-04 05:20:47

    Oh GOD! I think I saw a termite!

  • friend
    Blog infoarquitectura | 2011-12-21 18:23:06

    Incredible!!, didn´t know there was such a splendid structure in my own country

  • friend
    will | 2012-01-28 06:11:45

    Amazing. Very unique structure.

  • friend
    Simona | 2012-02-01 16:32:36

    Awesome! When I was in Seville there was not yet. Another reason to go back to this beautiful city!

  • friend
    Ted Harlson | 2012-03-08 23:49:27

    My first question was, "What is it?" Parasol, a shade from the sun. That's it? In organic mushroom form? I see, citizens kept in the dark! The mushroom theme additionally, destroys "modernity" applied to it. I think its hidious! I also bet the city also forced the taxpayers to pay for it too. O' to dream non-commercial dreams...

  • friend
    John Janssen | 2012-03-29 22:59:58

    Absolutely AMAZING design and structure! This should be on the "Must See" list of anyone who visits Europe! Destined to become one of Europe's most recognizable and famous sites!nnThe article was well written and concise! Excellent job!

  • friend
    Henry Friend | 2012-04-16 05:06:56

    I love the photography of David Franke of the building. Spain has a such a great history of bold architecture and this structure certainly fits that mould. I am instantly reminded of Gaudi and his work in Barcelona. There is a wonderful balance of space and structure here. I love it!

  • friend
    B.obTuse | 2012-06-12 12:21:30

    A hideous eyesore and a colossal waste of resources. 90 million euros and who knows how many millions of board/feet of timber glued together with toxic plastic foam. Better to build schools and hospitals and the like.

  • friend
    JStone | 2012-06-24 05:48:01

    So what happens when this wood starts to rot?

  • friend
    James topl | 2012-06-29 09:46:45

    My girlfriend and I accidentally found Metropol Parasol in July 2011. With Seville been such a beautiful old city, you wouldn't think something as modern as Metropol parasol would fit in. Well, it does! I would highly recommend anyone  from Australia or any other countries to go and see this amazing icon. I would put it up there with the statue of liberty and the Eiffel tower. We would love to have something like this in Melbourne Australia. 

  • friend
    bob | 2012-07-08 02:01:15

    Complete waste of 90 million euro

  • friend
    Gary R | 2012-07-16 08:56:58

    Such an amazing place, I hope to visit this year, just an incredible use of wood, and an incredible peace of architecture.

  • friend
    John | Estudio de Diseño | 2012-10-01 00:16:30

    I love it. I walked on this year.

  • friend
    Victor Sanders | 2012-10-04 09:44:12

    That is just another great example of impressive human engineering. You really have to give props to the person who designed it and to the team of people who managed to put it together. Such a wooden infrastructure makes me wonder how long it can last.

  • friend
    northierthanthou | 2012-11-08 02:30:46

    That is really neat. can't believe it's made of wood.

  • friend
    Philip Williams | 2013-05-10 15:02:41

    It's so interesting how this building provokes extreme reactions - you either love it or hate it! In itself it is a very bold and interesting design and it has led me to think of visiting Sevilla which I had never considered before. If it results in more tourists in the city then it will have a positive economic effect for many years to come. It is basically a steel and concrete structure with a wooden roof and from that point of view it is not the sustainable building which the "largest wooden structure in the world" hype suggests but none the less its fascinating. Tengo mucho ganas de verlo en realidad y visitar el resto de las sitios en sevilla. :-)

  • friend
    Felicity Rainnie | 2013-09-05 01:56:56

    We were in Sevilla last week . I had seen photos of the Metropol on the Internet when I was looking up Sevilla and was curious to see it in the flesh ! It's completely out of place in its surroundings but spectacular at the same time . When you turn the corner and there it is , it takes your breath away ! I have a lot of admiration for the architect who would design and have the courage to take on a project like this . We only had time to see it at night , looks beautiful all lit up . There were only two things I didn't like , one the colour , when I read that it was a wooden structure I thought you were going to see natural wood . You only know it has wood in it if somebody tells you . Of course it doesn't make us happy knowing that trees have been destroyed to make it . If it brings in income and tourism to an otherwise abandoned area is a good thing . Anyway we thought its an amazing structure and I'm happy we got to visit it . Loved Sevilla too ! What a city ....

  • friend
    Daniel Sanding | 2014-01-24 12:25:14

    Amazing! All these made by wood. Impressive human engineering.

  • friend
    Geoff Ninnes | 2014-04-13 07:06:07

    Seville is an amazing historic city with beautiful gardens,but as a structural engineer,the image of this amazing building/structure that I climbed all over will remain with me always.the city is in debt to the city mayor with the vision to convince the city to do this.i believe he no longer lives in spain

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