TORAFU's Haunted Play House At The Museum Of Contemporary Art In Tokyo

published in: Exhibitions, Art By Kerry Flint, 05 August 2013

Pin It

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

Some projects are so engaging and fun that you wish you could be a child again. The Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo is staging a summer exhibition for children entitled GHOSTS, UNDERPANTS and STARS and Torafu Architects (Koichi Suzuno, Shinya Kamuro) have created the most stunning and imaginative Haunted House ever.
 

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

This 'Haunted House' is not like any you will have seen before and comes in the form of a spooky gallery of paintings that at first seem ordinary but soon turn out to have some hidden surprises in store. The concept behind Torafu Architects’ ‘Haunted Play House’ is to challenge perspectives and norms where rules are broken as children are actually encouraged to run, shout and touch – activities usually forbidden in a gallery or a museum. Upon first entering the exhibition, nothing seems to be that odd at first but soon enough perspectives begin to change; eyes move as young visitors begin to experience a range of spooky happenings. In the surprise room they can even turn the table and become one of the tricksters themselves. How much fun is that?! And the fun doesn't stop there. After you have explored the secrets that fill this play house, you will find lots of eyeballs await you at the 'Bridge with Eyes'. So much thought and creativity has gone into this project it's simply astounding.
 
In Torafu Architects’ ‘Haunted House’ nothing is as it seems and this surreal and massively entertaining experience has visitors shaking with fear and excitement making adults wish they were children again.

© RMN-Grand Palais (musée du Louvre) / Michel Urtado /distributed by AMF-DNPartcom
photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

\

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

photo © Fuminari Yoshitsugu.

sources:

Torafu Architects

Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you. - {x}

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter the * required information where indicated. Please also rate the article as it will help us decide future content and posts. Comments are moderated. Please no link dropping, no keywords or domains as names; do not spam, and do not advertise!